The Sisterhood, “genre: proto-techno”

sisterhood_cd_gift_1The Sisterhood was a curio, spawned out of necessity by Eldritch to stop Wayne Hussey (the pantomime villain of the piece) stealing the name.

I have featured a good article on the Sisterhood’s meager, but excellent, output here (from Plunder the Tombs) but recently I had cause to read the Wikipedia entry on The Sisterhood and it was so interesting that I have posted it here in its entirety to preserve it for all time.

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Another good article on The Sisterhood’s “Gift” LP (Merciful Release, 1986)

sisterhood_cd_gift_1Another good article on the Sisterhood’s eponymous debut LP “Gift” (following on from this excellent article).

The Sisterhood – Gift (Merciful Release, 1986)

Let us now delve into one of the more tempestuous tales in the history of Gothic Rock.

We need to travel back to 1986 when The Sisters of Mercy were riding high on the success of their debut full length release First and Last and Always. Plans for the second album, reportedly to be called “Left on Mission and Revenge”, were underway, but all was not well. Recent gigs had been fraught with tension and guitarist and lead song-writer Gary Marx left the band mid-tour citing “personal differences”, and left The Sisters to complete tour dates of Europe and the US as a three-piece (Thompson, D. The dark reign of gothic rock: In the reptile house with The Sisters of Mercy, Bauhaus and The Cure, Helter Skelter (2002)). He’s by no means vanished from history however, and soon turns up in Ghost Dance with Anne-Marie Hurst, former vocalist with fellow Leeds Goth act Skeletal Family, who had regularly served as The Sisters’ support act.

However, we digress.

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The Quietus launches an ebook anthology of articles and interviews

quietusThe Quietus is a cracking publication/website, in its own words:

A new rock music and pop culture website. Editorial independent music website offering news, reviews, features, interviews, videos and pictures

Several of their excellent articles have been featured on this blog and, according to the stats, they are certainly popular with the Gods and Alcoves visitors.  Here are a few…

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Dark Circle Room update

som logo origDark Circle Room is a fantastic resource.  It is a treasure trove of goth, post-punk and new wave – bootlegs, demos, TV appearances, sessions – whatever.  It has so much Sisters material that it has to break its listings down by year.

Even though the site doesn’t link to any “official” recordings, it is the subject of repeated legal takedowns.

Get a fucking grip people – DCR is a critical resource documenting a significant period in music, in immense detail – they should be given a medal and free bandwidth.

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Sisters Of Mercy, “Victims Of Circumstance” bootleg CD

sisters vocThe Sisters of Mercy exploded in a joyous mess in the mid-80s [read about it in “the Difficult Genesis of the Sisterhood’s LP Gift“], but not before laying down some demos of new material.

Parts of this CD are a bit like a drunken Goth  karaoke mash-up party… fancy hearing First & Last &  Always music, but with Gary Marx singing about “Red Skies Disappear” over the top?  Or Andrew Eldritch singing “Garden of Delight” (later recorded by the Mission)?  Or Black Planet’s music with Wayne Hussey singing “Dance on Glass” over the top?  This is definitely worth a listen if you are an early Sisters Fan.

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The Sisterhood, the difficult genesis of “Gift”

Following hot on the heels of the Quietus’s 25th anniversary re-appraisal of the Sisters’ Floodland LP, here is an excellent account of the traumatic birth of the Sisterhood and their perennial debut “Gift”, from the equally excellent “Plunder the Tombs”.

Let us now delve into one of the more tempestuous tales in the history of Gothic Rock.

We need to travel back to 1986 when The Sisters of Mercy were riding high on the success of their debut full length release First and Last and Always. Plans for the second album, reportedly to be called “Left on Mission and Revenge”, were underway, but all was not well. Recent gigs had been fraught with tension and guitarist and lead song-writer Gary Marx left the band mid-tour citing “personal differences”, and left The Sisters to complete tour dates of Europe and the US as a three-piece (Thompson, D. The dark reign of gothic rock: In the reptile house with The Sisters of Mercy, Bauhaus and The Cure, Helter Skelter (2002)). He’s by no means vanished from history however, and soon turns up in Ghost Dance with Anne-Marie Hurst, former vocalist with fellow Leeds Goth act Skeletal Family, who had regularly served as The Sisters’ support act.

However, we digress.

Continue reading